What is Unity?

The Unity movement was founded by Charles and Myrtle Fillmore in 1889 as a healing ministry based on the power of prayer and the power of our thoughts to create our own reality. The Fillmore’s regarded Jesus as the great example rather than the great exception; interpreted the Bible metaphysically; and taught that God is present within all of us.

 

Practical Teachings for a Healthy, Prosperous and Meaningful Life

Spiritual seekers often say that finding Unity is like coming home. Unity is an open-minded, accepting spiritual community that honors all paths to God. We help people discover and live their spiritual potential and purpose.

A positive alternative to negative religion, Unity seeks to apply the teachings of Jesus as well as other spiritual masters. Unity affirms the power of prayer and helps people experience a stronger connection with God every day.

Unity emphasizes the practical, everyday application of spiritual principles to help people live more abundant and meaningful lives

 

Unity’s Five Principles: Our Core Beliefs

  1. God is the source and creator of all. There is no other enduring power. God is good and present everywhere.
  2. We are spiritual beings, created in God’s image. The spirit of God lives within each person; therefore, all people are inherently good.
  3.  We create our life experiences through our way of thinking.
  4.  There is power in affirmative prayer, which we believe increases our awareness of God.
  5.  Knowledge of these spiritual principles is not enough. We must live them.

 

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What Unity is NOT

Unity is not a church in the traditional sense but a Centre for like-minded people to gather for the purpose of experiencing the divine through Sunday services, classes and to fellowship and grow through prayer, service, activities and discussions.

 Although personal and spiritual growth come from within, most people appreciate learning, friendships, support and companionship along the way. Unity is committed to helping you find your way to your own understanding—and experience—of God.