Book of the Month

This month's featured book is

The Inner Journey: Views from Native Traditions

by: PARABOLA Anthology Series (Linda Hogan, Editor)

 

Drawn from 30 years of Parabola magazine, this compelling collection illuminates the vast scope of the Native American spiritual tradition. Well-known figures including Black Elk, Peter Matthiessen, Arthur Amiotte, Joseph Bruchac, N. Scott Momaday, and Joseph Epes reveal a continuing line of human apprenticeship with the earth in writings that span many genres, from poetry and stories to essays and interviews. In “Native Earth,” Matthiessen examines the interconnectedness of humans and the natural world, writing that “the whole universe is sacred, man is the whole universe, and the religious ceremony is life itself.” Linda Hogan’s “The Great Without” explores the impact of the outside world on human consciousness. These and other pieces convey the possibility of a life based on respect and love for the earth — a view that, in light of the ecological tragedies the contemporary world faces, is more relevant than ever.

 

*  Linda Hogan was inducted into the Chickasaw Nation Hall of Fame in 2007, and currently is Writer-in-Residence for the Chickasaw Nation. An internationally recognized public speaker and writer of poetry, fiction, and essays, she is the recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship and the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Native Writers Circle of the Americas, among numerous other honors. Hogan is the author of five collections of poetry, her most recent being Rounding the Human Corners (2008), which was nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. The Book of Medicines (1993) was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award. Other poetry collections have received the Colorado Book Award, Minnesota State Arts Board Grant, an American Book Award, and a prestigious Lannan Fellowship from the Lannan Foundation. People of the Whale (2008) is Hogans most recent novel. Other notable novels include Mean Spirit, (1991), winner of the Oklahoma Book Award, the Mountains and Plains Book Award, and a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, Solar Storms (1997), a finalist for the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award in Ireland, and Power, also a finalist for the International IMPAC. Her nonfiction includes Dwellings: A Spiritual History of the Living World (2007) and The Woman Who Watches Over the World: A Native Memoir (2002). With Brenda Peterson, she wrote Sightings: The Gray Whales' Mysterious Journey (2003) for National Geographic Books. Hogan has also edited several anthologies on nature and spirituality, including Inner Journey: Views from Native Traditions (2009). Hogan's script, Everything Has a Spirit, was a PBS documentary on American Indian Religious Freedom. She recently completed a short documentary for the REEL/ NATIVE series, A Feel for the Land (PBS/ American Experience).

She has also worked with Native youth in horse programs and continues to teach Creative Writing. A former Professor at the University of Colorado, she was only the second minority woman to become a Full Professor there. She now lives and works in Oklahoma, where she continues to teach creative writing. Hogan has been involved for 15 years with the Native Science Dialogues and the new Native American Academy, and for many years with the SEED Graduate Institute in Albuquerque. She is a faculty member for the Indigenous Education Institute and a fellow of the Black Earth Institute. Hogan was one of two invited writer-speakers at the United Nations Forum in 2008. Her work has been translated into most major languages by the U.S. Information Office, and she speaks and reads from her work both nationally and internationally. She was a Plenary Speaker at the Environmental Literature Conference in Turkey in November 2009, and presented a 90 minute program at the International Congress of the Parliament of World Religions in Melbourne in 2009.